Welcome to Sustainable Ohio

Sustainable Ohio is a non-profit, education organization dedicated to improving Ohio's environment and economy. Sustainable Ohio was founded in 2012, and currently manages the Ohio By-Product Synergy Network and participates in the ME3 Program . For more information about Sustainable Ohio, please contact Megan Moses by email at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or by phone at 614-847-4631.

 

Waste to Profit Network Emerges in Ohio

What do Procter & Gamble, Honda of America Manufacturing, Marathon Oil, Worthington Industries, and  the City of Columbus Department of Public Utilities all have in common? They are or were  members of the Ohio By-Product Synergy Network, a diverse group of companies and other organizations that are finding innovative ways to convert wastes into profits. By matching under-valued waste or by-product streams with potential users, they are reducing operating costs while protecting environmental resources. Potential benefits from the initial opportunities identified include avoidance of about 30,000 tons/yr of waste to landfill and about 230,000 metric tons/yr of CO2, along with about $3.5 million/yr in cost savings. These opportunities will also stimulate economic development and create new jobs by utilizing local resources instead of importing materials from other regions.

The Ohio BPS Network is a collaborative project that was launched in April 2010, under the sponsorship of the United States Business Council for Sustainable Development (US BCSD). The member companies range from giant multi-nationals to small and medium-sized enterprises. The project is co-sponsored by the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) and the Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission (MORPC), and is managed by the Center for Resilience at The Ohio State University (OSU), which has worked with US BCSD on similar projects in other regions.

To support BPS networks, OSU has developed an innovative tool for material flow optimization called Eco-Flow™, described in a forthcoming article  in the Journal of Industrial Ecology. For more information about industrial ecology as a business practice, see http://www.resilience.osu.edu/CFR-site/byproductsynergy.htm.

A variety of waste-to-profit opportunities are being investigated by Ohio BPS members; for example, organic wastes from several companies can become energy sources using a technology called anaerobic digestion that generates biogas. These advances are early signposts of an emerging “green” economy that could potentially replace displace traditional, resource-intensive supply chains. According to David Hanselmann, former Chief of ODNR’s Division of Recycling and Litter Prevention,  “This is an exciting time in Ohio for recycling. These businesses recognize that, by managing their waste streams more efficiently, they can save money, create jobs, and simultaneously reduce their environmental footprint by conserving water and reducing their energy consumption. Our job here at the ODNR is to support these types of recycling efforts that will ultimately allows us to reach the goal of 50% recycling for the state.”

Jerry Tinianow, former Director of the MORPC Center for Energy and Environment, agrees. "In an increasingly competitive world, regions that help local businesses avoid waste and needless disposal will gain a competitive advantage.  MORPC supports the Ohio By-Product Synergy Network as an important regional amenity that will allow businesses located here to operate more efficiently and with less pollution.  Every time the BPS Network links one company's waste to another's feedstock needs, both companies win, and the region as a whole benefits as well."

What do Procter & Gamble, Honda of America Manufacturing, Marathon Oil, Worthington Industries, and  the City of Columbus Department of Public Utilities all have in common? They are members of the Ohio By-Product Synergy Network, a diverse group of companies and other organizations that are finding innovative ways to convert wastes into profits (see www.OhioBPS.org). By matching under-valued waste or by-product streams with potential users, they are reducing operating costs while protecting environmental resources. Potential benefits from the initial opportunities identified include avoidance of about 30,000 tons/yr of waste to landfill and about 230,000 metric tons/yr of CO2, along with about $3.5 million/yr in cost savings. These opportunities will also stimulate economic development and create new jobs by utilizing local resources instead of importing materials from other regions.

The Ohio BPS Network is a collaborative project that was launched in April 2010, under the sponsorship of the United States Business Council for Sustainable Development (US BCSD). The member companies range from giant multi-nationals to small and medium-sized enterprises. The project is co-sponsored by the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) and the Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission (MORPC), and is managed by the Center for Resilience at The Ohio State University (OSU), which has worked with US BCSD on similar projects in other regions. To support BPS networks, OSU has developed an innovative tool for material flow optimization called Eco-Flow™, described in a forthcoming article  in the Journal of Industrial Ecology.  For more information about industrial ecology as a business practice, see http://www.resilience.osu.edu/CFR-site/byproductsynergy.htm.

A variety of waste-to-profit opportunities are being investigated by Ohio BPS members; for example, organic wastes from several companies can become energy sources using a technology called anaerobic digestion that generates biogas. These advances are early signposts of an emerging “green” economy that could potentially replace displace traditional, resource-intensive supply chains. According to David Hanselmann, Chief of ODNR’s Division of Recycling and Litter Prevention,  “This is an exciting time in Ohio for recycling. These businesses recognize that, by managing their waste streams more efficiently, they can save money, create jobs, and simultaneously reduce their environmental footprint by conserving water and reducing their energy consumption. Our job here at the ODNR is to support these types of recycling efforts that will ultimately allows us to reach the goal of 50% recycling for the state.”

Jerry Tinianow, Director of the MORPC Center for Energy and Environment, agrees. "In an increasingly competitive world, regions that help local businesses avoid waste and needless disposal will gain a competitive advantage.  MORPC supports the Ohio By-Product Synergy Network as an important regional amenity that will allow businesses located here to operate more efficiently and with less pollution.  Every time the BPS Network links one company's waste to another's feedstock needs, both companies win, and the region as a whole benefits as well."

Last Updated (Monday, 02 June 2014 12:28)

 

Welcome to the Ohio BPS Member Section

Thank you for participating in the Ohio By-product Synergy project.  Here you will find all current project information. This includes all presentations, handouts, meeting summaries, contact information, the data template and BPS database as well as a calendar of events and important dates.   We will regularly update the BPS database as new data arrives.

 

In order to gain access to the member section of the Ohio By-Product Synergy Network please use the login access.  If you are already logged in, please use the user menu on the left to navigate through the secure pages.

 

DNR awards grant to Ohio By-Product Synergy Network


The Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) has awarded a grant of $50,000 to The Ohio State University in support of the newly-established Ohio By-Product Synergy (BPS) Network. Companies in the network will be collaborating to find new uses for under-valued waste or by-product streams, helping to generate revenues or savings while reducing environmental burdens. The purpose of this grant is to enable the Ohio BPS project team to apply Ohio State’s Eco-Flow™ tool in order to assess the economic and environmental benefits of BPS to the broader community. According to the Chief of ODNR’s Division of Recycling and Litter Prevention, David Hanselmann, “Unlike other initiatives aimed at specific waste streams, BPS represents an innovative systems approach to waste elimination. We are pleased to contribute our knowledge and resources to this promising new network.” The Ohio BPS Network is a project of the U.S. Business Council for Sustainable Development, which has helped to launch similar projects in the U.S. and abroad.